US State of Maine Passes Cell Phone Privacy Laws

Published on:

By:

The US State of Maine has passed a law that blocks police from accessing an individual's cell phone records without securing a court warrant.

The new law, "An Act to Protect Cellular Telephone Privacy," sponsored by Senator Roger Katz (R-Augusta), came into effect at midnight.

"The Constitution doesn't safeguard privacy under some technologies but not under others, and it certainly doesn't say that guidelines are a sufficient replacement for warrants," said Shenna Bellows, executive director of the ACLU of Maine.

The new law, "An Act to Protect Cellular Telephone Privacy," sponsored by Senator Roger Katz (R-Augusta), came into effect at midnight.

However, Gov. LePage vetoed a related law that would have required a court warrant to track the location of a mobile phone. That veto was later overturned by the Legislature and the law will come into effect as well.

"We're disappointed that the governor supported warrant requirements for some new technologies but not others," said Bellows. "We can't just pick and choose when the Constitution applies and when it doesn't. The ACLU of Maine will continue pushing for privacy protections that ensure our police practices are in line with the Constitution."

Page Tools

 

Tags: maine  USA 

Sign up for our free daily email news alerts

Sample Copy